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Are Your Driving Habits Damaging Your Windshield?

I’m sure we’ve all heard plenty of stereotypes in our time and many of these stereotypes are about drivers and their cars. Some have to do with the person driving, others with the car itself, and some stereotypes deal with the cars AND the drivers and what it might say about their driving habits. While stereotypes can range from funny and spot on, others can be hurtful or just plain wrong. However, at times, they can be very helpful in predicting behaviors. 

So, what do driving stereotypes have to do with windshields?

Your windshield is one of the most important parts of your vehicle from both a structural and safety standpoint.  Any damage to the windshield, whether it be a small chip or larger crack, can significantly impact the safety it can provide. Stereotypes help identify specific driving habits and these habits, whether we want them to or not, can directly impact our windshield, and thus, our safety while driving. I know we may all claim to be the most attentive drivers, but there are certain habits we should avoid if we want to decrease the risk of damaging our windshield when we drive.

 

Top 4 Driving Stereotypes and Habits That Can Damage your Windshield

Stereotype #1: Driving a Jeep, Truck, or other Off-Road Vehicle 

Habit: Taking the road less travelled. AKA: the bumpier road with more rocks and gravel.

We all know that person who just loves to get off the main roads and do some exploring. And typically, their vehicle reflects this. Of course, this stereotype doesn’t apply to everyone, but most Jeep and truck drivers like to go off-roading at times. If you’ve ever been off-roading yourself, you know that these roads tend to be a little bumpier than usual, and often, full of gravel and potholes. As fun as this is, gravel roads and road with potholes are some of the most hazardous surfaces you can drive along in terms of keeping your windshield free from damage. Gravel pebbles can be kicked up by your tires or the tires of cars around you and cause a chipped or cracked windshield. One habit you can do to help mitigate this risk is to keep a sensible distance from the vehicle ahead and avoid super high speeds that may make windshield damage more likely. And if you do sustain a chipped or cracked windshield, just make sure to get it repaired before the next off-roading adventure!

Stereotype #2: Younger, New-ish Drivers 

Habit: Tailing the vehicle in front of them

Not all young drivers do this, but that “I’m young so nothing bad will happen to me” mentality is more prominent in new drivers. In actuality, most drivers, regardless of age, has likely been guilty of driving too close to the vehicle in front of them at some point. Maybe you are running late to work, in a rush to get somewhere before it closes, or your concentration drifts a bit. These factors, just to name a few, can all cause a driver to find themselves nearer to the car in front of them than the recommended “3 second rule.” This close proximity puts your windshield in direct line of any debris that the car in front may throw up with their tires, ultimately chipping or cracking your windshield. Furthermore, if you are on roads with a faster speed limit or are driving in extreme weather, extend this distance to a “5 second rule”. Maintaining this space is an easy way to avoid damage and a cracked windshield.

Stereotype #3: Older Vehicles and Overall Maintenance 

Habit: The older the car, the less importance vehicle maintenance becomes

While this stereotype certainly does not apply to all drivers, many assume that the older the car you drive, the less likely you will be to take care of it. So according to this stereotype, someone who drives an older model vehicle may wait quite a long time to repair or replace their chipped or cracked windshield. They see one crack forming and are more likely to wait until the crack spreads the diameter of the windshield or several more cracks have appeared to finally get around to replacing their windshield. We understand that it can sometimes be difficult to get something fixed so quickly. We also know that even with a damaged windshield, you will still need to get from point A to point B! If you must drive with a chipped or cracked windshield, you should drive very carefully to avoid any jolts or bumps. A small chip can quickly become a large crack under the right driving circumstances. Better yet, call Auto Glass 2020 the moment you first notice the chipped or cracked windshield and we can book a time that is soon (and convenient!) for your schedule.

Stereotype #4: Drivers and parking lots 

Habit: Certain drivers tend to only want “rock star” parking (AKA: the closest spot to the door) 

Maybe it’s because of the hot weather here in Arizona, but I’m sure we’ve all seen that driver in the parking lot keep circlingand circlingand circling the lot until they happen to grab one of the closest parking spots that exist. Yes, it would have been faster just to park in the back and walk to where you need to go, but let’s face it, some people just don’t want to do that! Choosing where you park can actually provide protection to your windshield when you are not actively driving it. When parking, finding an area with the greatest degree of shelter is always best. This shelter can decrease your windshield’s exposure to objects from passing vehicles, flying stones and gravel, and harmful weather conditions. And no, the best parking spot is not always the closest parking spot.

What to do if your Windshield is damaged. 

No matter how careful you are, sometimes damage to your windshield can occur through no fault of your own. If you notice a chipped or cracked windshield, get your windshield repaired as soon as possible. Taking care of a small problem now may help you to avoid windshield replacement later.

Where to get your windshield repaired in Arizona?

If you have a chipped or cracked windshield, don’t wait too long! Call Auto Glass 2020 today at (480) 283-7751 or get a quote here! We have the BEST AUTO GLASS TECHNICIANS in all of Phoenix and off the BEST INCENTIVES in town!